Civil Air Patrol USAF Auxiliary


Welcome to the Teaneck Composite Squadron resource website.  Here you will find information, upcoming events (including internal, external, squadron, group, and wing), and other important resources.

For further information visit our National Headquarters website :

gocivilairpatrol.com

and our New Jersey Wing website :



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Location and Meeting Nights


Our Unit meets on Tuesday Evenings at 1900 hours to 2200 hours .

Location: 
Teaneck Army National Guard Armory 
1799 Teaneck Road 
Teaneck , New Jersey 07666

Enter on the south side of the Armory at the 
Handicap Access Ramp; West Side Steel Door

Contact:

Unit Commander:
Major Sean Dunn 
 
Deputy Squadron Commander:
Captain Jose Rojas M.D. 


Deputy Squadron Commander for Seniors
Major Jose Loa


Deputy Commander for Cadets: 
Captain Nina Cavalli-Rojas



Past Commander
Maj Frank V. Tino,Jr.





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History of the Civil Air Patrol


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E3Q1aK_xuSM


The birth of the CAP is officially recorded as 1 December, 
1941.   
However, several key events prior to December 1941 laid 
the 
foundation of the organization.
  

In the pre-World War II years, 1938-1941, several
aviation advocates helped create the 
New Jersey Civil 
Defense Services 
made up of civilian 
aircraft,pilots and  
mechanics.
   

Several other states followed suit over the next few 
years.   

The primary purposes of the CDS units were to protect 
the ability 
for private pilots to fly once war began and 
to
 

  • Provide Over Flights against Sabotage Prone Security Sites
  • Provide a Pool of Trained Pilots and Crews for the Military

The visionaries responsible for pioneering the inception 
of this organization included both civilian and military 
leaders such as Gill Rob Wilson, General Hap 
Arnold, General John F. Curry, and several others. 

These men knew that if the U.S. entered WWII, civilian 
aviation would be severely restricted.

These determined pioneers worked together to 
convince President Roosevelt and Congress of the need 
for a National Civil Air Patrol.

Under the newly created Office of Civil Defense (OCD) 
in May 1941, OCD Director Fiorella LaGuardia established 
an aviation committee to draft the plans for a civilian 
aviation force. 
 

The results of that effort led to the birth of CAP on 
1 December, 1941.   

CAP's mission was to partner with the military to patrol
 the homeland and provide various 
flight services
to the Army, thereby freeing more active duty pilots for 
combat duty. 

During World War II, CAP was an integral part of North 
American defense, patrolling the 1,200 miles of coast 
line from Halifax, Nova Scotia, to the Florida Keys 
searching for enemy submarines and other 
signs of enemy activity.

 CAP pilots logged over 500,000 flight hours 
and are credited with sinking two submarines.   

WWII CAP pilots located and directed rescue teams to 
numerous sinking vessels saving hundreds of American  
lives as a result.

The C.A.P. flew border patrol along the Mexican border
 and was instrumental in the disruption of German 
spying activities. 

It also flew target towing, cargo and human 
transport for the Army, flew Forest Fire Patrol and 
entered into the search and rescue arena.  

Emergency Services

Growing from its World War II experience, the Civil Air Patrol has continued to save lives and alleviate human suffering through a myriad of emergency-services and operational missions.

Search and Rescue

                               
Perhaps best known for its search-and-rescue efforts, CAP flies more than 85 percent of all federal inland search-and-rescue missions directed by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center at Tyndall Air Force Base, Fl. Outside the continental United States, CAP supports the Joint Rescue Coordination Centers in Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico. Just how effective are the CAP missions? Nearly 100 people are saved each year by CAP members.

Disaster Relief 

                          
Another important service CAP performs is disaster-relief operations. CAP provides air and ground transportation and an extensive communications network. Volunteer members fly disaster-relief officials to remote locations and provide manpower and leadership to local, state and national disaster-relief organizations. CAP has formal agreements with many government and humanitarian relief agencies including the American Red Cross, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Aviation Administration, National Transportation Safety Board and the U.S. Coast Guard.


Humanitarian Services

                         
CAP flies humanitarian missions, usually in support of the Red Cross-transporting time-sensitive medical materials including blood and human tissue, in situations where other means of transportation are not available
.

Air Force Support

                       
It's hardly surprising that CAP performs several missions in direct support of the U.S. Air Force. Specifically, CAP conducts light transport, communications support, and low-altitude route surveys. CAP also provides orientation flights for AFROTC cadets. Joint U.S. Air Force and CAP search-and-rescue exercises provide realistic training for missions. 

Counterdrug


CAP joined the "war on drugs" in 1986 when, pursuant to congressional authorization, CAP signed an agreement with the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Customs Service offering CAP resources to help stem the flow of drugs into and within the United States.

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Aerospace Education

CAP's aerospace education efforts focus on two different audiences: volunteer CAP members and the general public.  The programs ensure that all CAP members (seniors and cadets) have an appreciation for and knowledge of aerospace issues.  To advance within the organization, members are required to participate in the educational program.  Aerospace educators at CAP's National Headquarters at Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala., provide current materials that reflect the highest standards of educational excellence.  Aerospace education is divided into two parts: internal and external.         

The internal aerospace education program has two parts as well: cadet and senior. Cadets complete aerospace education as one of the requirements to progress through the  achievement levels of the cadet program. Senior members have a responsibility to become knowledgeable of aerospace issues and the Aerospace Education (AE) Program that CAP provides. They are further encouraged to share the information obtained with their local communities and school systems.                                

CAP's external aerospace programs are conducted through our nation's educational system.  Each year, CAP sponsors many workshops in states across the nation, reaching hundreds of educators and thereby thousands of young people.  These workshops highlight basic aerospace knowledge and focus on advances in aerospace technology.  CAP's aerospace education members receive more than 20 free aerospace education classroom materials

To learn more about CAP's aerospace education programs, products, and other resources available to our members, go to www.capmembers.com/ae.  For information about joining as an aerospace education member (AEM) and to join online, go to www.capmembers.com/joinaem


How do you Join C.A.P.?

We ask that you sit in on 3 Squadron meetings whether you are thinking of joining as a Cadet or as a Senior Member. By sitting in on 3 meetings you will get to see a variety of perspectives in the Cadet or Senior program and then you can make an informed decision.

Once you have decided after the 3rd meeting that you are serious about joining the program we will give you all the required paperwork that you will need to fill out and then assist you in sending it into C.A.P.National Headquarters at Maxwell AFB, AL. Cadet paperwork is easy to fill out and the Senior member paperwork is similar in concept, except for a finger print card that you will need to have done at your local police station so that an FBI Records check might be accomplished.

Once you have all your paperwork filled out and sent into National Headquarters at Maxwell AFB, AL it will be a few weeks and then you will receive a starter package of books for either the Senior Member program OR the Cadet Program which will include a binder with a CD that contains all the needed manuals to start the program.

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Calendar for NJWG Civil Air Patrol & Squadron Activities 

Click this link below to go to the New Jersey Wing Calendar, CAP :


                   Click here: Wing Calendar - NJWG Homepage

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RESOURCE LIBRARY 


Resource Library for Civil Air Patrol Regulations, Pamphlets & NJWG Forms and Documents :

 




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Contact Information





    






C/Lt Col John Glidden - NER CAC Representative  email: john.glidden@njwg.cap.gov


C/Capt Matthew K. Rojas - NJWG CAC Representative     matthew.rojas@njwg.cap.gov

 


Location and Meeting Nights

Our Unit meets on Tuesday Evenings at 1900 hours to 2200 hours .


Location:
Teaneck Army National Guard Armory
1799 Teaneck Road
Teaneck , New Jersey 07666



Enter on the south side of the Armory at the
Handicap Access Ramp; West Side Steel Door


**************************************************************************************************


How do you Join C.A.P.?

We ask that you sit in on 3 Squadron meetings whether you are thinking of joining as a Cadet or as a Senior Member. By sitting in on 3 meetings you will get to see a variety of perspectives in the Cadet or Senior program and then you can make an informed decision.
Once you have decided after the 3rd meeting that you are serious about joining the program we will give you all the required paperwork that you will need to fill out and then assist you in sending it into C.A.P.National Headquarters at Maxwell AFB, AL. Cadet paperwork is easy to fill out and the Senior member paperwork is similar in concept, except for a finger print card that you will need to have done at your local police station so that an FBI Records check might be accomplished.
Once you have all your paperwork filled out and sent into National Headquarters at Maxwell AFB, AL it will be a few weeks and then you will receive a starter package of books for either the Senior Member program OR the Cadet Program which will include a binder with a CD that contains all the needed manuals to start the program.



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Staff Directory

Below is a directory of the Cadet and Senior Member staff at the Teaneck Composite Squadron
NJ 035.
This directory should only be used in certain cases such as:
Emergency's
Situations in which a POC has been designated
Mission Situations
Situations in a break in the Chain of Command is warranted
Please use proper discretion when utilizing this directory. Routine messages or issues should be brought to the attention of your Cadet Staff through the "Contact" page of this site.




Squadron Commander:  sean.dunn@njwg.cap.gov


Deputy Squadron Commander : jose.rojas@njwg.cap.gov


Deputy Commander for Seniors: jose.loa@njwg.cap.gov


Deputy Commander for Cadets: nina.cavalli-rojas@njwg.cap.gov


C/CCAPT Matthew K. Rojas    Cadet CC matthew.rojas@njwg.cap.gov



C/CAPT Liam McCabe Cadet Deputy Cadet Commander  liam.mcabe@njwg.cap.gov



Captain Raul Gonzalez Aerospace Education Officer  raul.gonzalez@njwg.cap.gov



Captain Nina-Cavalli-Rojas Cadet Activities Officer   nina.cavalli-rojas@njwg.cap.gov



Captain Lynne Reilly Personnel & Administration Officer  lynne.reilly@njwg.cap.gov

SM Tahir Talmeez  Assistant Personnel Officer           tahir.talmeez@njwg.cap.gov


2Lt KuJim Nela   Safety Officer  kujtim.nela@njwg.cap.gov

 
Maj Jose Loa          
jose.loa@njwg.cap.gov
Recruitment 

IT NCO :  S/M Tahir Talmeez  tahir.talmeez@njwg.cap.gov

C/Lt Col John C. Glidden III  NER CAC Representative john.glidden@njwg.cap.gov

C/Capt Matthew K. Rojas NJWG CAC Represenative    matthew.rojas@njwg.cap.gov

S/M Eric A. Cinotti : National Guard Liasion ( SFC )     eric.cinotti@njwg.cap.gov  



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New Members Information


Civil Air Patrol has two main membership levels, Senior 
Member and Cadet. 

To join as a Cadet member, you have to be 12 to 18 years old.

For a senior member, the age requirement is 18+.

The link below gives a brief overview of some of the activities 
that you can become involved with through the Civil Air Patrol 



Cadet Programs

Cadets at FTX









While there are many youth oriented programs in 

America today, CAP's cadet program is unique in that it

 uses aviation as a cornerstone.  

Thousands of young people from 12 years through 

age 21 are introduced to aviation through CAP's 

cadet program.  

The program allows young people to progress at their 

own pace through a 16-step program including 

aerospace education, leadership training, physical 

fitness and moral leadership.  Cadets compete for 

academic scholarships to further their studies in fields 

such as engineering, science, aircraft mechanics, 

aerospace medicine, meteorology, as well as many 

others. Those cadets who earn cadet officer status may 

enter the Air Force as an E3 (Airman First Class) rather 

than an E1 (Airman Basic).
 
Whatever your interests-survival training, flight 

training, photography, astronomy-there's a place for 

you in CAP's cadet program.  Each year, cadets have 

the opportunity  to participate in special activities at 

the local, state, regional or national level.  Many cadets 

will have the opportunity to solo fly an airplane for the 

first time through a flight encampment or academy.  

Others will enjoy traveling abroad through the 

International Air Cadet Exchange Program. 

Still others assist at major air shows throughout the 

nation.


Senior Member Programs

Ground Search and Rescue


Though Civil Air Patrol is known for its flying missions, CAP 

adults members, known as Senior Members, do so much more 

than just fly. In fact less than a fifth of all CAP members are 

pilots or aircrew members. CAP adult members come from all 

walks of life. Some are doctors, nurses, paramedics, or other 

medical professionals. Others are lawyers, paralegals, 

accountants, computer programmers, and other business 

professionals and executives. Mechanics, cooks, teachers, 

police officers, clergy, parents, really just about any career or 

background can be useful to and found in the ranks of the 

CAP adult membership. 

CAP supports a variety of missions that require adults from all 

walks of life that you may not know about.


In emergency services and operations we not only need aircrew members, but also ground team members 

to aid in the rescue of survivors or to assess damage after a 

disaster. 


CAP needs communications personnel to relay critical 

messages when there is limited or no telephone support.  


Administrative staff, financial managers, logistics and supply 

personnel are needed to document missions and get personnel critical supplies and equipment in the field 

that they need to conduct missions.


CAP also needs adults to support the cadet program. CAP has 

over 26,000 cadets across the country that need mentors 

willing to help guide and support them. 


The cadet program ....

provides young adults between the ages of 12 and 21 a well 

rounded program of leadership, aerospace education, physical 

fitness, and moral and ethical decision making. In today’s 

world we need good people who are willing to step up and 

help provide a healthy, drug-free environment to develop 

tomorrow’s leaders. 


Many former cadets have gone into the military, government 

jobs,or private sector employment.

 

That is where they can and do make a difference, and really 

excel. 


There are many military general officers that were once CAP 

cadets.  


Senators and congressman, CEO's and Corporate 

Executives, and others credit their success to CAP and the 

adult members who mentored them.



CAP needs adults for its aerospace education program. 

 

In addition to educating our own members, CAP’s adult leaders 

provide training and resources to teachers who reach out to 

students of all ages across the country.  


Aviation and aerospace impacts the lives of Americans every 

day, and CAP works to ensure that citizens know the how 

valuable aviation and aerospace is in our world.

Essentially, there is a place for any interested adult to join 

and help CAP. 



For more information about the CAP adult program 

visit our Adults FAQ page. 


Click here to get more information on how to join